Having a flexible schedule myself, I am more than happy to accommodate the schedule of any school that I teach chess at and I am not just limited to running after-school chess programs.

For this reason, if a school wants to have a chess program in the morning, afternoon or evening I am more than flexible to making something work at any time during the day.

The main goal of my chess class is to engage students in a broad curriculum that covers all the different facets of the game.

So if a student wants to, he or she will have the preparation, knowledge, and confidence to compete against other chess playing peers in local and national chess tournaments.

The average chess class lasts one hour per day and sometimes an hour and fifteen minutes. During my classes, I not only aim to make every minute count but to have students engaged in systematic learning procedure that is diverse, instructional and fun. That is why each hour class is divided into three time periods, an instructional time period, a video time period and a casual game playing period.

For the first twenty minutes of class, students are briefly introduced to a major chess topic and that topic is presented on a demonstration board. After a few minutes of instruction, the students are asked to solve problems on the demonstration board as part of our inquisitive and engaging teaming approach.

Students are then shown a few chess related videos that are both instructional and entertaining like a famous game between world champions, a biography about a great chess player or just a fun chess cartoon in 3D animation.

For the last part of the class, the chess students have a casual game playing period where they can test out what they learned over the chess board and develop solid friendships with their chess playing peers.